Commercial Courts: An Ideal Venue to Resolve Complex Business Cases

by Rachel Bir

Indiana’s Commercial Court project was approved by the Indiana Supreme Court in January 2016 and the project became operational in June 2016. Initially, the Commercial Court project launched in six counties across the state. However, since then, the project has grown and now there are Commercial Courts located in Allen County, Elkhart County, Floyd County, Hamilton County, Lake County, Madison County, Marion County, St. Joseph County, Vanderburgh County, and Vigo County, taking the total to ten counties throughout Indiana.

...Read More

Gutwein Law Adds Spencer W. Tanner to Evansville Office

by Gutwein Law

Evansville, IN – July 8, 2022 – Gutwein Law, a full-service business law firm focused on helping innovative companies grow through high-level legal counsel, has added Spencer Tanner to its Evansville, IN office. He joins Gutwein Law from Stoll Keenon Ogden PLLC, a large regional law firm, where he brings years of experience practicing in the areas of general commercial litigation and bankruptcy/creditor's rights.

...Read More

You've Been Sued, Now What?

by Rachel Bir

The advice of an experienced attorney is absolutely critical to success in litigation -- whether that success comes in the form of a win in court or a favorable settlement. An experienced litigator, like the ones at Gutwein law, will think steps ahead and anticipate what the opposing party may do throughout the litigation process enabling you to obtain the best possible outcome for your situation.

Given that anyone can be sued at any time, we think it's important that our current and prospective clients have a basic understanding of the litigation process, so they can obtain proper counsel, and ultimately, have their interests protected.

Below, we've outlined the litigation process in seven steps to give you an idea of what it's typically like to be involved in a lawsuit.

...Read More

What the Booking.com Decision Means for Trademarking Generic Names

by Greg Geiser

Recently, the Supreme Court provided some clarity and guidance to trademark protection for generic terms registered as a domain and used as a trademark. In Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B. V., No. 19-46 (U.S. Jun. 30, 2020), the Court held that the mark “Booking.com” is not generic and is capable of trademark registration, even though the term “booking” is generic for a class of goods and services related to online hotel registrations. Essentially, the Patent and Trademark Office was arguing for a bright line rule that the addition of a generic Internet-domain-name suffix to an already generic term, for a related category of goods, is also generic; i.e. one cannot trademark the term “generic.com” for a generic description of a category of goods.

...Read More

COVID-19: The Heightened Risk of Litigation for Employers

by Hayes Cronk

In continuation of our recent commentary on the COVID-19 pandemic, we're examining the latest litigation risks for employers in today's blog post. Because of COVID-19, employers of all sizes have been forced to make difficult decisions regarding employment. These decisions have led to furloughs, increased sick leave, productivity concerns, pay cuts, and termination of employees, all of which ultimately raise litigation concerns.

The boundary between termination and retention is more blurred than ever before. And this lack of distinction naturally leads to contract claims. Additionally, termination can raise non-compete issues if an employee is subject to a non-compete covenant, as well as wrongful termination issues.

...Read More